Epub – Cerebral Cortex
Differential gene expression between callosal and ipsilateral projection neurons in the monkey dorsolateral prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices

April 19, 2022

Arion D, Enwright JF, Gonzalez-Burgos G, Lewis DA

Reciprocal connections between primate dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC) and posterior parietal (PPC) cortices, furnished by subsets of layer 3 pyramidal neurons (PNs), contribute to cognitive processes including working memory (WM). A different subset of layer 3 PNs in each region projects to the homotopic region of the contralateral hemisphere. These ipsilateral (IP) and callosal (CP) projections, respectively, appear to be essential for the maintenance and transfer of information during WM. To determine if IP and CP layer 3 PNs in each region differ in their transcriptomes, fluorescent retrograde tracers were used to label IP and CP layer 3 PNs in the DLPFC and PPC from macaque monkeys. Retrogradely-labeled PNs were captured by laser microdissection and analyzed by RNAseq. Numerous differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were detected between IP and CP neurons in each region and the functional pathways containing many of these DEGs were shared across regions. However, DLPFC and PPC displayed opposite patterns of DEG enrichment between IP and CP neurons. Cross-region analyses indicated that the cortical area targeted by IP or CP layer 3 PNs was a strong correlate of their transcriptome profile. These findings suggest that the transcriptomes of layer 3 PNs reflect regional, projection type and target region specificity.

Differential gene expression between callosal and ipsilateral projection neurons in the monkey dorsolateral prefrontal and posterior parietal cortices. Arion D, Enwright JF, Gonzalez-Burgos G, Lewis DA. Cereb Cortex. 2022 Apr 19:bhac157. doi: 10.1093/cercor/bhac157. [Epub ahead of print]. PubMed PMID: 35441221.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/35441221/

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