Epub – Scientific Reports
Cell type specific cannabinoid CB1 receptor distribution across the human and non-human primate cortex

June 10, 2022

Chou S, Ranganath T, Fish KN, Lewis DA, Sweet RA

Alterations in cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) are implicated in various psychiatric disorders. CB1R participates in both depolarization induced suppression of inhibition (DSI) and depolarization induced suppression of excitation (DSE), suggesting its involvement in regulating excitatory and inhibitory (E/I) balance. Prior studies examining neuronal cell type specific CB1R distribution have been conducted near exclusively within rodents. Identification of these distribution patterns within the human and non-human primate cortex is essential to increase our insight into its function. Using co-labeling immunohistochemistry and fluorescent microscopy, we examined CB1R protein levels within excitatory and inhibitory boutons of male human and non-human primate prefrontal cortex and auditory cortices, regions involved in the behavioral effects of exogenous cannabinoid exposures. We found that CB1R was present in both bouton populations within all brain regions examined in both species. Significantly higher CB1R levels were found within inhibitory than within excitatory boutons across all regions in both species, although the cell type by brain region interactions differed between the two species. Our results support the importance of conducting more in-depth CB1R examinations to understand how cell type and brain region dependent differences contribute to regional E/I balance regulation, and how aberrations in CB1R distribution may contribute to pathology.

Chou S, Ranganath T, Fish KN, Lewis DA, Sweet RA. Cell type specific cannabinoid CB1 receptor distribution across the human and non-human primate cortex. Sci Rep. 2022 Jun 10;12(1):9605. doi: 10.1038/s41598-022-13724-x. [Epub ahead of print]. PMCID: PMC9187707.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9187707/

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